Remote Reinforcements, Part 2.

I had planned for the Yáokòng series to be an integral part of my Tiger Solider inspired foray into genric Yu Jing, but really dragged my feet getting them ready for some reason. I painted the Wèibīng first, but ended up building and using more lists with the Hùsòng. I had sort of expected this, so to facilitate more rapidly getting a fully painted Hùsòng on the table in a pinch, I sunk a long vertical pin into the hip joint of the Wèibīng’s where the turret/body sits, drilled a corresponding hole in the turret and never glued it, so that once I had painted the Hùsòng turret I could simply swap it over with the Wèibīng’s. Painting was almost identical to the Wèibīng, with different geometry but no new colours, so didn’t take that long once I got started.

Even now after both models have been finished, the body sits very sturdy and stable on the pin, so I never glued it. This has the added bonus of greatly increasing the transport-ability of the two remotes, as I can sit the legs in one cell of a classic GW 1.5 x 1 inch precut foam insert and the turret in another, no cutting required. For contrast, in a later post I’ll have to show off just how drastic modification was required to get the perpetuallydisintegrating Yáoxiè series mobile…

Being available in some form or another to almost all factions, Total Reaction HMGs are something every player has to learn to deal with early on in their Infinity learning curve. They have some very hard counters that are not particularly complicated to pull off, so there appears to be an enjoyable cycle in some Infinity scenes where everyone is taking TR HMG remotes, so everyone is taking hard counters, so everybody stops taking their TR HMG remotes, so everybody eases back on the counters and suddenly someone springs a TR HMG on the table again. Few of my pieces can claim such an impressive body count, and few others can claim to have been knocked out and repaired so many times in a single game.

The meaning and pronunciation of the Yáokòng part of the name was covered in the post about the Wèibīng. Hùsòng is written with the characters 护送 and means the verb “escort”.

Husong

Hù/护 is a verb that means “protect”, and sounds like the “hoo” in “hoot”. 送/Sòng sounds almost exactly like the English word of the same spelling, the song that often accompanies dance. The character is verb that means to “carry”, “deliver” or “send off”, so when you combine both characters together you get a verb that implies protection whilst something is moved from one place to another.

Much like the Wèibīng unit logo, the Hùsòng  prominently features the character for a number, this time the number two (二/Èr).

Husong logo

Remote Reinforcements, Part 1.

DSC01961 Been a while since I painted a new unit type. This time round it’s a Yáokòng Wèibīng, one of Yu Jing’s generic remotes. The Wèibīng is a veritable toolbox of neat gadgets that, in addition to its low points cost and ability to interact with scenario objectives, make it an attractive choice in all game types where a narrow door is unlikely to occur. In previous games I’ve been impressed by the Crane Agent‘s sensor, so it will be nice to bring one to the table for less than 50 pts.DSC01966 I love remotes. I wish  I could say I love painting them, but the truth is it’s a bit of a chore. At least this one didn’t explode like the Incredible Crash Dummies with the slightest handling, like the Rui Shi did/does The worst part is undercoating, because there is always a bit of metal peaking through that you only notice as the next paint is squeezed onto the pallet. Once that was done it was pretty smooth sailing. I probably spent the same amount of time looking at the photos and artwork online as I did painting colours. Hopefully this will mean that the impending Hùsòng will be much quicker and easier to paint. DSC01968 The dominant orange, is of course, the same orange I use on most things since the Zuyong Invincible. For the redder orange, I originally attempted to do it in the same colour I did on the Crane, Pheasant, Celestial Guards and Kuang Shi (that is, omitting the scrofulous brown from the recipe) but it was way too dull, so I went back to the drawing boards. In the end, I used a basecoat of Orange Brown (shared wit the rest of the armour panels), washed to hell with Cavalry Brown, then layered with GW Firey Orange. After that I washed it to hell with Cavalry Brown again. I pretty much made it up as  I went along, I’m not sure if all steps are necessary but I will do it again on the Hùsòng in the same manner to play it safe. DSC01969 The Yáokòng part of this unit’s name is written with the characters 遥控, which together mean “remote control”. Yaokong The Yáo/遥 character is the same one that is common to all Yu Jing Remotes. Kòng/遥 character, not dissimilar in sound to the “Kong” in “King Kong”, is a verb meaning control. Wèibīng is written with the characters 卫兵, which together form a noun meaning “guard”, with military specific connotations as we will see below. Weibing Wèi/卫 is a verb meaning guard, protect or defend. It is pronounced just like the whey Little Miss Muffet eats whilst waiting for spiders. Bīng/兵 is a character that means soldier, which sounds exactly how it looks, just like the search engine. The Yáokòng Wèibīng unit logo prominently features the character for one (一/Yī). The other remotes in the Yáokòng series predictably feature the characters for 2,3 and 4, but we will talk more about numbers when that Wu Ming with MULTI Rifle + light grenade launcher is done. Weibing Logo