Remote Reinforcements, Part 2.

I had planned for the Yáokòng series to be an integral part of my Tiger Solider inspired foray into genric Yu Jing, but really dragged my feet getting them ready for some reason. I painted the Wèibīng first, but ended up building and using more lists with the Hùsòng. I had sort of expected this, so to facilitate more rapidly getting a fully painted Hùsòng on the table in a pinch, I sunk a long vertical pin into the hip joint of the Wèibīng’s where the turret/body sits, drilled a corresponding hole in the turret and never glued it, so that once I had painted the Hùsòng turret I could simply swap it over with the Wèibīng’s. Painting was almost identical to the Wèibīng, with different geometry but no new colours, so didn’t take that long once I got started.

Even now after both models have been finished, the body sits very sturdy and stable on the pin, so I never glued it. This has the added bonus of greatly increasing the transport-ability of the two remotes, as I can sit the legs in one cell of a classic GW 1.5 x 1 inch precut foam insert and the turret in another, no cutting required. For contrast, in a later post I’ll have to show off just how drastic modification was required to get the perpetuallydisintegrating Yáoxiè series mobile…

Being available in some form or another to almost all factions, Total Reaction HMGs are something every player has to learn to deal with early on in their Infinity learning curve. They have some very hard counters that are not particularly complicated to pull off, so there appears to be an enjoyable cycle in some Infinity scenes where everyone is taking TR HMG remotes, so everyone is taking hard counters, so everybody stops taking their TR HMG remotes, so everybody eases back on the counters and suddenly someone springs a TR HMG on the table again. Few of my pieces can claim such an impressive body count, and few others can claim to have been knocked out and repaired so many times in a single game.

The meaning and pronunciation of the Yáokòng part of the name was covered in the post about the Wèibīng. Hùsòng is written with the characters 护送 and means the verb “escort”.

Husong

Hù/护 is a verb that means “protect”, and sounds like the “hoo” in “hoot”. 送/Sòng sounds almost exactly like the English word of the same spelling, the song that often accompanies dance. The character is verb that means to “carry”, “deliver” or “send off”, so when you combine both characters together you get a verb that implies protection whilst something is moved from one place to another.

Much like the Wèibīng unit logo, the Hùsòng  prominently features the character for a number, this time the number two (二/Èr).

Husong logo