Tech Support

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The original Yu Jing Mech-engineer has long been one of my favorite models to use and photograph, despite me never getting around to giving her an article of her own. You can see her prominently in the photos for many posts I wrote about remotes. This is because her career on the table has been very focused on the support of Yu Jing’s remotes, where she has performed admirably, returning them to the fight and occasionally surprising all with turn 3 heroics. We salute her and wish her well for her retirement.

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My main motivation for getting the new modelwas mainly because I like the Doctor model from the same box. I like the new engineer too of course. He is more congruent with the current Yu Jing aesthetic since N3, both in terms of design and colour.

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With regards to how I have used the profile, to be honest I would have used generic Yu Jing in less than 10% of my games to date. This is because I prefer to use maximum-sized core fireteams for first turn defensive ARO. In those games where I have played generic Yu Jing, I have tended to compensate for my feeling of reactive turn vulnerability by enrolling two Yaokong Husong Remotes to help me survive until my first turn. I also almost always take a Rui Shi, because they are still SO good. The presence of the Mech-engineer provides two distinct benefits depending on who you are up against: They either fix the remotes, or never get the chance to try,  because the opponent really makes sure the remotes are destroyed beyond repair. The latter often takes an extra order on top of killing the remote, and if the remote put up an order-depleting fight before going to sleep, then the attacker is even more likely to make sure it will never get back up. Two levels of unconscious thanks to Remote Presence rule make this more of an investment than simply finishing off the average battlefield casualty in cold blood. Thus the engineer may function as slightly more expensive cheerleader that may drain an extra order per remote each game. He’ll see a lot more table now that Invincible Army has landed and White Banner Army is about to.

cofI normally include a Yaozao in the list to extend the Engineer’s repair capabilities to multiple Remotes. Sometimes that adorable Yaozao’s speed and lack of order generation make it the best candidate for jobs that are too dangerous to risk a human. This includes touching off mines and discovering camo markers.

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They also have Zhanshi combat aptitude that, while basic, may come in handy. It’s not something you plan on, but they often end up included in coordinated suppression orders as an afterthought, keeping the deployment zone just a little bit safer. Just occasionally, their status as specialists sees them attempt late game battlefield heroics.

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Painting the new engineer was pretty agreeable. He’s a big guy with a pose that presents some nice flat surfaces without too much being obscured by his limbs. No surprises with how the orange armour was painted. Clothing is Vallejo Heavy Blackgreen mixed with Games Workshop Regal Blue. Whites started as GW Fortress Grey with increasing white added. Skin was Vallejo Bronze Fleshtone washed with Cavalry Brown.

On to the name. The Chinese name of the Mech-Engineer, printed on his unit logo is Zhànshì gōngchéng (战士工程).

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Zhànshì (战士) is the same word that is used for the Yu Jing’s most basic line trooper. The ‘Zh’ sound of Zhàn is pronounced like the end of “judge“, starting at the ‘d’. The ‘an’ rhymes with “ran”. The character  (战) stands for combat. This can be from wars to battles to brawls. “Shi” sounds like the first part of “shit”. The character (士) is usually used as a suffix to denote a professional. The two characters in gōngchéng (工程) together mean Engineering.

Gongcheng Gōng (工) denotes work, labour, trades, crafts, etc. It sounds just the name of the metal instrument. Chéng (程) denotes sequences, rules, formulas etc. It sounds somewhere between how a random pool of English speakers would instinctively say the word “Cheng” and “Chung”.

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Remote Reinforcements, Part 2.

I had planned for the Yáokòng series to be an integral part of my Tiger Solider inspired foray into genric Yu Jing, but really dragged my feet getting them ready for some reason. I painted the Wèibīng first, but ended up building and using more lists with the Hùsòng. I had sort of expected this, so to facilitate more rapidly getting a fully painted Hùsòng on the table in a pinch, I sunk a long vertical pin into the hip joint of the Wèibīng’s where the turret/body sits, drilled a corresponding hole in the turret and never glued it, so that once I had painted the Hùsòng turret I could simply swap it over with the Wèibīng’s. Painting was almost identical to the Wèibīng, with different geometry but no new colours, so didn’t take that long once I got started.

Even now after both models have been finished, the body sits very sturdy and stable on the pin, so I never glued it. This has the added bonus of greatly increasing the transport-ability of the two remotes, as I can sit the legs in one cell of a classic GW 1.5 x 1 inch precut foam insert and the turret in another, no cutting required. For contrast, in a later post I’ll have to show off just how drastic modification was required to get the perpetuallydisintegrating Yáoxiè series mobile…

Being available in some form or another to almost all factions, Total Reaction HMGs are something every player has to learn to deal with early on in their Infinity learning curve. They have some very hard counters that are not particularly complicated to pull off, so there appears to be an enjoyable cycle in some Infinity scenes where everyone is taking TR HMG remotes, so everyone is taking hard counters, so everybody stops taking their TR HMG remotes, so everybody eases back on the counters and suddenly someone springs a TR HMG on the table again. Few of my pieces can claim such an impressive body count, and few others can claim to have been knocked out and repaired so many times in a single game.

The meaning and pronunciation of the Yáokòng part of the name was covered in the post about the Wèibīng. Hùsòng is written with the characters 护送 and means the verb “escort”.

Husong

Hù/护 is a verb that means “protect”, and sounds like the “hoo” in “hoot”. 送/Sòng sounds almost exactly like the English word of the same spelling, the song that often accompanies dance. The character is verb that means to “carry”, “deliver” or “send off”, so when you combine both characters together you get a verb that implies protection whilst something is moved from one place to another.

Much like the Wèibīng unit logo, the Hùsòng  prominently features the character for a number, this time the number two (二/Èr).

Husong logo